Process

Clay and glaze experimentation is what intrigues me. I invest a large amount of time towards these developments, and as other potters can attest – it is a life of trial and error. It is the wide-eyed child in me that gets excited to see what can happen when I mix one thing with another, and when that magical union between science and art occurs. I am compelled to keep inventing and experimenting.

I dig local porcelain, stoneware and earthenware, and I intentionally work with existing impurities such as rocks, twigs and other matter. These impurities contribute to my unpredictable clay surfaces and add to the unique surface treatment that I am attracted to.

I purchase certain ingredients and clays that are not indigenous to this area, or that are too difficult to extract. Over time I have acquired local granite, slate, calcium, quartz, limestone, potash, salts and wood ash to create unrefined glazes. My work is fired at different temperatures, in different atmospheres, and I use different types of fuels. These variations give the clay a surface that is cohesive with natural substances, and lends an essence of age and history to the forms.

 

wheel work


wheel work

Loading the wood fired kiln

Loading the wood fired kiln

Unloading the wood fired kiln

Unloading the wood fired kiln

In the moment

In the moment

Packaging and distribution


Packaging and distribution

Glazing the inside of a vessel

Glazing the inside of a vessel

Coiled thrown pot on the kick wheel

Coiled thrown pot on the kick wheel

Wedging unprocessed local earthenware

Wedging unprocessed local earthenware

Digging local earthenware on a warm fall day


Digging local earthenware on a warm fall day

Prep. work for handing attachment

Prep. work for handing attachment

Test tile production

Test tile production

Splitting wood for the kiln

Splitting wood for the kiln